Importance of Wahabi Movement in India

Wahabi Movement in India
The Wahhabi Movement: Aberration/Apparition | Angels Do Speak!®
  • Syed Ahmed of Rai Bareilly, influenced by Saudi Arabia’s Abdul Wahab (1703-87) and Delhi’s Shah Waliullah, launched the Wahabi Movement, which was primarily an Islamic revivalist movement.
  • Syed Ahmed denounced western influences on Islam and argued for a restoration to genuine Islam and society as it existed in the Arabia of the Prophet. Syed Ahmed has been hailed as the ideal leader (Imam).
  • Sithana in the northwestern tribal belt was chosen as the base of operations for a nationwide organization with an extensive secret code for operating under spiritual vice-regents (Khalifas).
  • Its main base in India was Patna, but it also had missions in Hyderabad, Madras, Bengal, United Provinces, and Bombay. A jihad was called against the Sikh kingdom of Punjab because Dar-ul-Harb (the land of kafirs) was to be converted into Dar-ul-Islam (the land of Islam).
  • The English dominion in India became the sole focus of the Wahabis’ attacks after the overthrow of the Sikh monarch and inclusion of Punjab into the East India Company’s dominion in 1849.
  • The Wahabis were instrumental in instilling anti-British attitudes. The Wahabi resistance was reduced by a series of British military operations in the 1860s on the Wahabi base at Sithana and multiple court proceedings of sedition against the Wahabis, while irregular interactions with the authorities lasted into the 1880s and 1890s.

  • Syed Ahmed of Rai Bareilly, influenced by Saudi Arabia’s Abdul Wahab (1703-87) and Delhi’s Shah Waliullah, launched the Wahabi Movement, which was primarily an Islamic revivalist movement.
  • Syed Ahmed denounced western influences on Islam and argued for a restoration to genuine Islam and society as it existed in the Arabia of the Prophet. Syed Ahmed has been hailed as the ideal leader (Imam).
  • Sithana in the northwestern tribal belt was chosen as the base of operations for a nationwide organization with an extensive secret code for operating under spiritual vice-regents (Khalifas).
  • Its main base in India was Patna, but it also had missions in Hyderabad, Madras, Bengal, United Provinces, and Bombay. A jihad was called against the Sikh kingdom of Punjab because Dar-ul-Harb (the land of kafirs) was to be converted into Dar-ul-Islam (the land of Islam).
  • The English dominion in India became the sole focus of the Wahabis’ attacks after the overthrow of the Sikh monarch and inclusion of Punjab into the East India Company’s dominion in 1849.
  • The Wahabis were instrumental in instilling anti-British attitudes. The Wahabi resistance was reduced by a series of British military operations in the 1860s on the Wahabi base at Sithana and multiple court proceedings of sedition against the Wahabis, while irregular interactions with the authorities lasted into the 1880s and 1890s.

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